Gay Boston Guide: Nightlife Roundup

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Boston, the “Hub of the Universe” hasn’t exactly been known for its hot nightlife these last few years. Considering that Manhunt and Grindr were both started here, it may not be surprising that nightlife was adversely affected early and severely by the rise of online dating sites.
Maybe there’s a little backlash brewing against the anonymity and somewhat unsocial aspect of online dating outlets or maybe bars and clubs are finally stepping up their game to entice men away from their laptops and smart phones.

Paradise in Cambridge, Mass., just over the river from Boston’s Back Bay neighborhood, has vastly expanded its downstairs, more than doubling its space and adding a bar, and remains one of the most popular clubs in town, especially fun on Fridays and Saturdays.
The bar/club still offers six nights of hot male dancers so on most days you can sneak away from that conference or meeting and check out some hot guys.

Machine offers a wide range of elaborately themed parties and events throughout the week, making it a great place for dancing, cruising, and watching videos nearly every night. Carved from the underbelly of Ramrod, Machine has steadily brought energy and a much-needed jolt to Boston’s somewhat anemic club scene over the years. The club attracts mostly men but also a significant portion of women with ultramodern decor, several long bars, a huge dance floor, a cool video/light show, hot dancers and lots of space to move around. Upstairs, the Boston Ramrod is still the most popular leather/Levi’s bar, with spectators welcomed.
Nearby and loveably divey and campy, Jacques Cabaret has been Boston’s capital of drag for generations — it features the scintillating Trani-Wreckage show every other Monday. The place puts on two shows and closes nightly at midnight, so be sure to arrive promptly to see the show.
Just over two hours away by car, Provincetown in Cape Cod offers, well, everything you’d expect from the world’s gayest beach town. Shopping, tanning, and swimming are all part of this vacation-within-a-vacation excursion.

 

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Single Gays in Boston ― Put Your Hands Up!

Gay online dating in Boston is becoming an excellent substitute to finding people in your state who are worth dating. Even if you go out and mix with gay singles on a regular basis in Boston you’ll still benefit from creating a free profile online, and then letting the internet do work for you. It’s easy to create a personal ad that will get viewed by hundreds of promising dates every week, which gives you another avenue to help spice up your love life.

Internet dating is appealing to most Boston gay singles because it doesn’t take a lot of time. Depending on how active you get it can take as little as ten minutes a day just checking your emails, or a few hours a week looking for possible dates and contacting them. It’s an excellent way to make friends as well as find lovers. Once you have your profile up doing the work for you, you can have other Boston singles viewing your profile while you’re out doing something else. This is easily achievable once you have your profile up in less than 10 minutes.
Online dating saves time over finding out what other Boston Gay singles are into. Most of what you’ll need to know is on their profile. You can see exactly what they’re looking for in another single so you can tell instantly if they’re going to be attracted to you. You can list your preferences on your own profile, and your personal ad is a method of streamlining your dating progress so that you have a better chance of meeting the kind of single that attracts you the most.
Once someone has sent you a message you get the option to reply to them, or not. If you feel someone is going to be wasting your time you can choose to ignore them. It’s not like being out where you would have to speak to them, online you can ignore them, and if you need to, you can prevent them from contacting you altogether.
Because of all the tools you get when you use an online dating service you can be matched up with like minded gay Boston singles within seconds. Personality match systems are becoming the norm so as long as you have filled in your profile as detailed and as accurate as possible you’ll be matched with possible dates.
Gay online dating in Boston is a fun, safe and secure way of exploring another side to dating away from the bar and club scene. Thousands of singles are enjoying the benefits of this method of finding love interests and making new friends. Singles are getting into relationships that never would have happened if they hadn’t created their online dating profile.








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Boston’s Finest: Openly Gay Couple Joins Boston Police Force

Photo by Angela Rowlings Courtesy of Boston Herald.

Two new lawmen now patrol the streets of Beantown. They’re young, they’re fit and they’re partners — as in, they’re a gay couple. But please, they ask: don’t call them “The Gay Cops.”
“It’s not just here come the gay cops, that’s not how we want it to sound to people. We worked hard like everybody else. We scored 100s on the exams,” said James Moccia, whose father and brother are already Boston Police Officers.
He and his partner Shawn MacIver are the first openly gay couple to ever graduate from a police academy together.
They met five years ago when they both worked as security guards at a gay bar in Boston. Even though they dreamed of becoming police officers, it took a long time to consider it a realistic career for gay men.

“Throughout my life I just kind of put it on the back burner. I have a degree in fashion design,” said Moccia. “I had reservations even going into the academy, which is why I entered in my 30s rather than my 20s.”
They say their classmates are like family, and couldn’t have been more supportive. They hope tolerance in uniform will be matched by tolerance in the community they serve.
“With the Commissioner hiring such a diverse command staff already,” said Moccia, “it kind of set a foundation for us as minorities to kind of feel more comfortable and feel more of a connection.”

How Boston has been celebrating LGBT pride for 45 years

The first Boston gay pride parade was in 1971. Forty-five years and hundreds of thousands of people later, the celebration still takes over the city every June.



Dick Bourbeau in his South End home.

Courtesy

“Someone said they’d take me to a gay bar, and I said, ‘Gay bar, what’s that?’” said Dick Bourbeau, recounting his first year in Boston. “They explained it’s a bar where all the customers are gay and I said ‘You’ve got to be kidding me.’”
It was 1970. Bourbeau had just gotten out from a four-year tour with the U.S. Army Security Agency. He went to that bar, and soon became involved in the city’s gay scene. In 1973, he marched in Boston’s third Pride Parade. He hasn’t missed one since.

Bourbeau’s first parade was the first to turn down Charles Street, and he clearly remembers seeing people hanging out their windows and leaning over their roof decks cheering. He didn’t know Beacon Hill was so gay-friendly then.

“It was wild,” Bourbeau said. “I’ve never seen anything like that.”
That support was a far cry from his Army days, where he had to hide his sexuality for fear of receiving a dishonorable discharge.
“That would ruin your life,” he said.
“They explained it’s a bar where all the customers are gay and I said ‘You’ve got to be kidding me.’”
He would wake up hours before his fellow soldiers to shower alone as a way to avoid any embarrassment in the group showers. After the Army, Bourbeau knew he didn’t want to go back to Connecticut; his dad was strongly homophobic. Boston became a safe haven, but even here, in later years, Bourbeau said he had to worry about under cover policemen who would try to entrap gay men in the Boston Public Library bathrooms.
Forty-five years later, he considers Boston his “little niche” and is still showing his pride. This year marks the 45th anniversary of the Boston Pride Parade, and Bourbeau will be there representing the Boston Prime Timers, a “brotherhood of mature gay men,” for which he is an honorary board member and club historian.
“It’s something I look forward to because it’s a very visual bringing together of the community,” Bourbeau said.

“People generally think that we’re about 10 percent of the population—the gay community—but I happen to believe we’re bigger than that.”

Bourbeau admitted that you can’t tell the LGBT population based on parade attendance—many people in the crowd might just be allies—but the parade itself proves that the community demands to be seen.
About 300 people attended the first march in 1971, according to Libby Bouvier, an archiver and board member for the Boston-based LGBT History Project. This year’s Pride Guide, a magazine published by Boston Pride, estimated the 2014 parade as having 25,000 marchers, 150,000 guests, and 400,000 spectators.

The ‘71 event was explicitly political: marchers singled out four locations around the city as platforms to read off their demands. Starting at Jacque’s, a legendary drag bar in the Bay Village, the community raised concerns over the club’s issues with misogyny and treatment toward lesbian patrons.
At Berkeley and Stanhope streets, where Boston police headquarters was previously located, marchers demanded the police provide protection, rather than harassment, in areas surrounding gay bars.
The State House was next, and marchers called for the repeal of laws against sodomy and to enact laws to end discrimination. Last was St. Paul’s Cathedral, which served as a symbol at which to denounce the religious persecution of homosexuals.
Those first few hundred marchers “were people who felt comfortable or able or willing to participate in a public event such as the pride rally,” Bouvier said. “To carry signs and to be with their people who may have been ‘more out.’”

“We always try to capture that Pride is a celebration, but it’s also a concentration of rights.”

Now, Pride is a week of festivities that ends in a huge parade full of floats, vivid costumes, and seemingly endless entertainment. City Councillor Ayanna Pressley tweeted that this year’s pride is “history in the making:” 230 groups are present for 50 events over 10 days.
“It’s interesting because we always try to capture that Pride is a celebration, but it’s also a concentration of rights,” said Sylvain Bruni, president of Boston Pride. “It’s a celebration of who we are out there but also being wicked proud at being physical–still marching, still political, still showing elected officials and decision makers that we’re here and asking for full equality.”
Pride is universal, but this year’s “Wicked Proud” parade theme is inherently Boston. Bruni’s first Pride was in 2004, when the parade coincided with the Commonwealth legalizing same-sex marriage. He came from France to study at MIT, and now, serving as Pride’s president since 2013, he’s become closely tied to both the city and the celebration.
“During the parade, between all of the chaos that’s happening in the background, I always try to take five minutes and watch the crowd,” Bruni said. “To me, that moment is very powerful and emotional.”
Bruni knows the first Pride parade someone attends can change their life. It did for him. Even after 45 years of parades, he said “it’s always someone’s first Pride.”


Original post from Boston.com:







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Gay Boston Event: Boston Pride Hosts Annual Block Parties in Back Bay and Jamaica Plain

Back Bay
Boston Pride  45th Anniversary-#WickedProud Week Ends with Thousands of Party-Goers in Back Bay and JP
Boston Pride will host block parties in the Back Bay and Jamaica Plain on Sunday, June 14th in celebration of the 45th Anniversary- #WickedProud Pride Week. The Back Bay Party is from noon to 8pm, at St. James Ave. between Arlington Street and Berkeley Street. In Jamaica Plain, Boston Pride is teaming up again with Dyke Night Productions for the JP block party from 2pm to 8pm on Perkins Street.

“Boston Pride will end our 45th Anniversary Pride Week with a bang with our two annual block parties in the Back Bay and Jamaica Plain,” said Sylvain Bruni, President of Boston Pride. “We have an incredible lineup of entertainment at both parties as we celebrate Pride in Boston’s neighborhoods. We thank the community for its continued support and participation!”
“Dyke Night Productions is thrilled to partner with Boston Pride again this year- especially in celebration of its 45th Anniversary,” said Kristen Porter, founder of Dyke Night Productions. “This year, the JP Block Party will have live music, and of course, Divas, Dogs and Drag Show and Adoption event where our community has shown overwhelming compassion in helping to find homes for rescue dogs.”

The Back Bay Block Party will feature entertainment headlined by EDM sensation DJ Tatiana, will open with DJ Andrea Stamas, include a special performance by American Idol and The Voice alumna singer Frenchie Davis, food, and a cash bar! Tickets for this year’s block party are $15, with $5 going toward the Boston Pride Community Fund. Tickets can be purchased online to avoid the line at the front door.
This year’s Jamaica Plain Block Party will kick off with live music, face painting, food and cash bar. Crys Matthews & Triana Wilson Acoustic Showcase will then perform, leading up to the Divas, Dogs, and Drag Show featuring rescue dogs who are available for adoption. During the show there will also be drag king and queen performances with emcee Sapphira Cristal and headliner Lakia Mondale. Boston’s own DJ LeahV will take over and electrify the stage until closing! There will be a $10 suggested donation at the door before 5pm, and a $15 suggested donation after 5pm, with $5 going toward the Boston Pride Community Fund.

Both Block Parties will take place rain or shine. More information and details for Boston Pride’s 2015 Pride Week can be found at www.bostonpride.org


Original post from Boston Pride: